Tag Archives: looking for a job

Starting the year with the right “Who”

I recently completed a book that I believe that either most business people have heard of or even read, “Good to Great” by Jim Collins. After reading the book I had a couple of thoughts that relate to HR and where I believe 2015 trends are going (thanks Forbes).

Good-to-GreatMy colleagues and I talk a lot about “great employees” and how many times we lose them for the wrong reasons. However, what I loved about the book, and specifically the chapter on “first who then what,” was the notion of hiring great people even if you don’t have a role.

Like most organizations, January is the sign of a new budget approved, or the final ending of a fiscal year, which means that things usually slow down (specifically in the talent acquisition realm). However, how many times do you lose a great candidate due to timing?

Now with Gen Z coming (it is true) and Gen Y taking leadership roles, I suspect HR will need to catch up by taking less linear and more holistic employee centric approaches to both attract and retain the next two generations of our business world.

Food for thought, based on the book, Level 5 leaders start with the “who” and then go to the “what”, but as Gen Y’ers become first time leaders, they like to win (stereotype, absolutely) but they also will follow rules if it lets them win faster. So possibly, HR (and other business) processes are stopping potential Level 5 leaders in developing sooner.

Now there are three principles in the book to help you become “rigorous,” and like all things in January, there is one that sounds like a New Years resolution. “When you know you need to make a people change, act.” To put this in other words, if you see your plant dying, water it. If you don’t like the number on the scale, do something. If you want something, do something about it.

Good luck to those out there looking for great talent.

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How to resign (with class)

Oh what! You got a new job! Wicked!

But before you leave your current employer to the place where you want to be, there are some ‘best practices’ you should take to leave on a good note. Here are some practices I have seen play out well in a variety of environments:Screen Shot 2014-01-31 at 6.32.09 AM

  1. Give ample notice. If your role is specialized, manager level, or unique, give more notice to help with the transition – you will need to gauge your relationship with your manager & past performance.
  2. Own the transition documentation and training and provide feedback and progress reports to your manager.
  3. Offer being available and check in for the first week (honoring your word and living by them).
  4. Be responsible for messaging and communicating. Offer to own the communication and follow up. Remember: every company is different, so this might not work everywhere.
  5. Get your hands dirty, when your last days are empty, get in and file documents that you know are sitting around or do some admin (like correcting naming conventions).
  6. Clean up your desk. Simple, right? Nope – time and time again the artifacts of previous employees sit around and just collect dust. If you think something should be in the garbage, do it. #recyclefirstplease
  7. Send personalized thank you notes to people who made a difference and respond to each congrats email you get. #gratitude

Not all these will apply, but remember that your last few weeks are equally as important as your last couple months, years or decades. Lastly, best of luck on your new adventure!

For those who use apps for everything, this is an interesting spin on quitting a job. Although I have yet to hear of someone using it for real!

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